Ideology in Politics, the Nutritional Sciences, & Beyond

N.C. Wyeth - The Unwrit Dogma (1917) Increasingly into adulthood, I notice how often people will cling to their ideological convictions at the expense of the wellbeing of themselves and others. Probably this is unconscious in the majority of people: their reflexive, deflective neural pathways for shutting down cognitive dissonance are so strong that they … Continue reading Ideology in Politics, the Nutritional Sciences, & Beyond

Perfectionism, Mind, & Mitochondria: Dismantling the Rabblement

Moonlight Sorrow (ca. 1856) by Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa One factor in creative block is that the threshold of self-consciousness about the desired manifestation of your ideas overrides your ability to take action and create those ideas. In other words, your idiosyncrasies are not embraced within, and so are implicitly suppressed by your superego, and … Continue reading Perfectionism, Mind, & Mitochondria: Dismantling the Rabblement

Purposeful Foundations, Dependency Paradox, Calibration Orientation, Learned Helplessness vs. Learned Mastery

Having love and purposeful foundations that we can depend on allows us to venture out into the world with resilience, knowing that any failures occurring in the fray are not a measure of our inherent worth or unworth, since our love and foundations are already an assurance of our worthiness. This phenomenon—that we achieve independence … Continue reading Purposeful Foundations, Dependency Paradox, Calibration Orientation, Learned Helplessness vs. Learned Mastery

How Regret Aids Growth: The Evolutionary and Philosophical Use of Regret

In a modest research study interviewing young adults on their emotional states, regret was found to be the second most common verbally-expressed human emotion, right underneath love (Shimanoff, 1984). Given regret's extrapolated prevalence, the intensity that we feel the “sensations” of regret, and therefore its untold influence on our decisions, it’s important to think about … Continue reading How Regret Aids Growth: The Evolutionary and Philosophical Use of Regret

Meditation as Mental Recalibration: Benefits and Neuropsychology

It’s staggeringly clear that unmanaged stress is a primary contributor to degenerative processes, hearkening back to the 20th century research of Dr. Walter Cannon on the sympathoadrenal system and Dr. Hans Selye's “general adaptation syndrome” theory of stress. Stress is physiological and psychological, and so are the problems it causes; not only aging and illness, … Continue reading Meditation as Mental Recalibration: Benefits and Neuropsychology

Creative Absorption & Production: Embodied Cognition, Empathy, and Exploration in the Artistic Process

New learning is rewarded with new paths becoming visible, because the more we learn, the more we're able to integrate previously unknown concepts into our field of understanding, and then the more material we have to reflect on and generate novel work from those reflections, transmuting what's been absorbed into innovation; any worthy concept or … Continue reading Creative Absorption & Production: Embodied Cognition, Empathy, and Exploration in the Artistic Process

Self-Reliance in an Authoritarian Culture

Thinking for yourself is a continuous struggle, a quality that must be nourished and championed within the self because we're under constant coercion, even self-coercion that urges us to default to someone else's way of thinking. It's a great relief when we can trust and follow someone's advice because it provides security. Often this can … Continue reading Self-Reliance in an Authoritarian Culture

How to Cultivate Creativity & Confident Process In Your Work

Over the last year, I’ve done the most creating that I probably ever have, and it seems that maneuvering the hurdles of the creative process is a skill in itself. I think it’s important to talk about the possible mechanisms behind that, for myself and others, those looking to develop or enhance their creative potential. … Continue reading How to Cultivate Creativity & Confident Process In Your Work

David Lynch’s Tuna Diet: Artist Automation & Troubleshooting Life’s Problems

Something that David Lynch revealed in 2000 on the Charlie Rose show always stuck out to me. Barring vacations, he eats the same meals everyday: tuna with tomatoes, feta cheese, and olive oil for lunch, and chicken and broccoli with soy sauce for dinner. This way, he never has to think about that aspect of … Continue reading David Lynch’s Tuna Diet: Artist Automation & Troubleshooting Life’s Problems

Friendship & Play as Vital Medicines

Life arose spontaneously when given sufficient energy, and has always been defined by continuous exploration and expansion. Situational inhibition, the restriction of avenues to discovery, atrophies the organism. Stasis is antithetical to life, and embedded mechanisms maintain this law by gradually shutting down dormant organismal components--holistic rigor mortis. For some perspective: 10-15% of muscle strength … Continue reading Friendship & Play as Vital Medicines