How Regret Aids Growth: The Evolutionary and Philosophical Use of Regret

In a modest research study interviewing young adults on their emotional states, regret was found to be the second most common verbally-expressed human emotion, right underneath love (Shimanoff, 1984). Given regret's extrapolated prevalence, the intensity that we feel the “sensations” of regret, and therefore its untold influence on our decisions, it’s important to think about … Continue reading How Regret Aids Growth: The Evolutionary and Philosophical Use of Regret

Meditation as Mental Recalibration: Benefits and Neuropsychology

It’s staggeringly clear that unmanaged stress is a primary contributor to degenerative processes, hearkening back to the 20th century research of Dr. Walter Cannon on the sympathoadrenal system and Dr. Hans Selye's “general adaptation syndrome” theory of stress. Stress is physiological and psychological, and so are the problems it causes; not only aging and illness, … Continue reading Meditation as Mental Recalibration: Benefits and Neuropsychology

Creative Absorption & Production: Embodied Cognition, Empathy, and Exploration in the Artistic Process

New learning is rewarded with new paths becoming visible, because the more we learn, the more we're able to integrate previously unknown concepts into our field of understanding, and then the more material we have to reflect on and generate novel work from those reflections, transmuting what's been absorbed into innovation; any worthy concept or … Continue reading Creative Absorption & Production: Embodied Cognition, Empathy, and Exploration in the Artistic Process

Parkinson’s Disease: A Leaky Gut-Brain Toxicity Syndrome

In the 1800s and early 20th century, physicians observed the phenomenon of Parkinson’s patients improving, sometimes into full remission, when their bowel health was optimized (Parkinson, 1817). 19th century physician Dr. Hermann Senator, a Prussian internal medicine specialist, speculated that latent intestinal bacteria could cause “self-infection” and eventual disease, and Dr. Ludwig Brieger, a German … Continue reading Parkinson’s Disease: A Leaky Gut-Brain Toxicity Syndrome

Parkinson’s Disease as a Manifestation of Mercury Toxicity

Andrew Hall Cutler, a Princeton chemical engineer, emphasized the evidence linking mercury poisoning to Parkinson’s Disease, even citing the 9th ed. of Merritt’s Textbook of Neurology that, as clinical protocol, mercury toxicity should be considered as an alternative diagnosis for Parkinson’s patients. I wonder how many times that has ever actually occurred. “[The textbook authors] … Continue reading Parkinson’s Disease as a Manifestation of Mercury Toxicity

Self-Reliance in an Authoritarian Culture

Thinking for yourself is a continuous struggle, a quality that must be nourished and championed within the self because we're under constant coercion, even self-coercion that urges us to default to someone else's way of thinking. It's a great relief when we can trust and follow someone's advice because it provides security. Often this can … Continue reading Self-Reliance in an Authoritarian Culture

How to Cultivate Creativity & Confident Process In Your Work

Over the last year, I’ve done the most creating that I probably ever have, and it seems that maneuvering the hurdles of the creative process is a skill in itself. I think it’s important to talk about the possible mechanisms behind that, for myself and others, those looking to develop or enhance their creative potential. … Continue reading How to Cultivate Creativity & Confident Process In Your Work

Endotoxin’s Role in Degeneration and Disease; Protective Factors to Mitigate it

Lipopolysaccharides, also called endotoxins, are structural components of bacteria that are released in the intestine and safeguarded against by an optimal physiology and the integrity of the intestinal barrier, but unhealthy lifestyles, bad eating habits, genetic predispositions, or infections can increase endotoxin concentration to intolerable levels, or make us more sensitive to “normal” levels, for … Continue reading Endotoxin’s Role in Degeneration and Disease; Protective Factors to Mitigate it

Caffeine Caution: Reconsidering the World’s Favorite Plant Drug

Since writing my article praising coffee in February during a honeymoon phase, I spent much of this year learning about coffee and caffeine as it exists in reality, and not through a lens of confirmation bias or wishful thinking. Like almost any plant, there are potentially positive benefits, some poisonous and detrimental effects, and some … Continue reading Caffeine Caution: Reconsidering the World’s Favorite Plant Drug

Academic Elitism, Working-Class Stress, Hope for the Future

New scientific research in the age of social media follows a pattern of rapid streamlining onto every major news source, where the headline presents the information in the most sensationalist, alarmist, or controversial framing they possibly can. Thus, the dilution of usually very complex, sometimes ambiguous, scientific research is used dishonestly, to further ideological prejudices … Continue reading Academic Elitism, Working-Class Stress, Hope for the Future