Meditation as Mental Recalibration: Benefits and Neuropsychology

It’s staggeringly clear that unmanaged stress is a primary contributor to degenerative processes, hearkening back to the 20th century research of Dr. Walter Cannon on the sympathoadrenal system and Dr. Hans Selye's “general adaptation syndrome” theory of stress. Stress is physiological and psychological, and so are the problems it causes; not only aging and illness, … Continue reading Meditation as Mental Recalibration: Benefits and Neuropsychology

Caffeine Caution: Reconsidering the World’s Favorite Plant Drug

Since writing my article praising coffee in February during a honeymoon phase, I spent much of this year learning about coffee and caffeine as it exists in reality, and not through a lens of confirmation bias or wishful thinking. Like almost any plant, there are potentially positive benefits, some poisonous and detrimental effects, and some … Continue reading Caffeine Caution: Reconsidering the World’s Favorite Plant Drug

Psychomuscular Memory & Biopsychological Integration

A sustained tolerance to stressors seems ever-expandable, as novel fears are confronted, explored, and conquered, although various factors and phenotypes maintain a baseline discomfort in certain situations, and it seems that no amount of exposure therapy will completely habituate them. In these people, I suspect a maladaptive psychology creates branching dysfunction, where cumulative pathological perceptions … Continue reading Psychomuscular Memory & Biopsychological Integration

Solutions for Dissociation, Trauma, and Related Disease

Stressors, mental and physical, are an everyday encounter necessary for growth and change but trauma inhibits these. Think of your muscles: stress is a strain, it can wear you out; extreme or inescapable stress is trauma; it is an injury, a wound causing long-term or permanent damage. You are changed after trauma. Most people will … Continue reading Solutions for Dissociation, Trauma, and Related Disease