Preserving your Mind in the Age of Hyperstimuli

We are living through a pandemic of psychiatric illness—depression, ADHD, personality disorders, and resulting psychosocial carnage and suicide, are on the rise; directly linked to electronic devices and social media, the severity of symptoms is seen to increase in proportion to the amount of a person’s screen time.  These maladies have especially increased since the … Continue reading Preserving your Mind in the Age of Hyperstimuli

How Regret Aids Growth: The Evolutionary and Philosophical Use of Regret

In a modest research study interviewing young adults on their emotional states, regret was found to be the second most common verbally-expressed human emotion, right underneath love (Shimanoff, 1984). Given regret's extrapolated prevalence, the intensity that we feel the “sensations” of regret, and therefore its untold influence on our decisions, it’s important to think about … Continue reading How Regret Aids Growth: The Evolutionary and Philosophical Use of Regret

Self-Reliance in an Authoritarian Culture

Thinking for yourself is a continuous struggle, a quality that must be nourished and championed within the self because we're under constant coercion, even self-coercion that urges us to default to someone else's way of thinking. It's a great relief when we can trust and follow someone's advice because it provides security. Often this can … Continue reading Self-Reliance in an Authoritarian Culture

Academic Elitism, Working-Class Stress, Hope for the Future

New scientific research in the age of social media follows a pattern of rapid streamlining onto every major news source, where the headline presents the information in the most sensationalist, alarmist, or controversial framing they possibly can. Thus, the dilution of usually very complex, sometimes ambiguous, scientific research is used dishonestly, to further ideological prejudices … Continue reading Academic Elitism, Working-Class Stress, Hope for the Future

Friendship & Play as Vital Medicines

Life arose spontaneously when given sufficient energy, and has always been defined by continuous exploration and expansion. Situational inhibition, the restriction of avenues to discovery, atrophies the organism. Stasis is antithetical to life, and embedded mechanisms maintain this law by gradually shutting down dormant organismal components--holistic rigor mortis. For some perspective: 10-15% of muscle strength … Continue reading Friendship & Play as Vital Medicines

Shaping our Stances: The Psychology of Opinionated Rigidity

People are usually unwilling to consider another viewpoint’s validity or change their opinion unless they (consciously or not) believe it will benefit them. This usually involves a subconscious prioritization of fallacious shortcuts to reduce cognitive dissonance, ego defense, social circle groupthink and assimilation to maintain short-term harmony, internal and external. If the pursuit of truth … Continue reading Shaping our Stances: The Psychology of Opinionated Rigidity