Best Ways to Treat Akathisia That Actually Might Work

Left: Diego Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1650), and, Right: Francis Bacon's Study After Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1953). Akathisia is a great example of the horrors of iatrogenic illness: illness, created by medical treatments, that has never existed before in human history. The fact that it is so much more excruciating … Continue reading Best Ways to Treat Akathisia That Actually Might Work

Why is Everyone so Sick & Fat? Sugar, Starch, Leaky Gut, & Dysbiosis

Sugar and starch, in the doses we eat that are normalized by the modern world, are poisons to the gut and the brain. Their effects are so destructive, and their use so addictive, that in the future they may rightfully be seen as recreational drugs. It is not that carbohydrates are simply “bad”. It is … Continue reading Why is Everyone so Sick & Fat? Sugar, Starch, Leaky Gut, & Dysbiosis

Achievement Society & its Dissidents

At a certain point, you have to lower your standards to get anything done. Lower them now so they can be higher later. Byung-chul Han describes our achievement society as the next evolutionary step after Foucault’s disciplinary society. Occurring within neoliberal globalist capitalism and associated with sterilized digital aesthetics, the achievement society implants the disciplinary … Continue reading Achievement Society & its Dissidents

What Conspiracy Theorists & Fake Skeptics Both Get Wrong About Conspiracies

Preface: The first draft of this article started in early 2020, and attempted to equally highlight the mistakes of both conspiracy theorists and fake skeptics, or conspiracy deniers. But the situation has become so awful in mainstream media and discourse that the article’s final draft is ultimately more sympathetic to the “conspiracy theorists”. Any remnants … Continue reading What Conspiracy Theorists & Fake Skeptics Both Get Wrong About Conspiracies

“Good bacteria” as armor for navigating the world

Seeing science through a philosophical-artistic lens leads to useful allegories for understanding life. If we think of ourselves as beings working interdependently with the environment, we can emphasize biological relationships inside our own bodies to see how they contribute to wellbeing, which enhances the wellbeing of those we interact with.  The beneficial bacteria in our … Continue reading “Good bacteria” as armor for navigating the world

Preserving your Mind in the Age of Hyperstimuli

We are living through a pandemic of psychiatric illness—depression, ADHD, personality disorders, and resulting psychosocial carnage and suicide, are on the rise; directly linked to electronic devices and social media, the severity of symptoms is seen to increase in proportion to the amount of a person’s screen time.  These maladies have especially increased since the … Continue reading Preserving your Mind in the Age of Hyperstimuli

Ideology in Politics, the Nutritional Sciences, & Beyond

N.C. Wyeth - The Unwrit Dogma (1917) Increasingly into adulthood, I notice how often people will cling to their ideological convictions at the expense of the wellbeing of themselves and others. Probably this is unconscious in the majority of people: their reflexive, deflective neural pathways for shutting down cognitive dissonance are so strong that they … Continue reading Ideology in Politics, the Nutritional Sciences, & Beyond

Cinnamon as Economic Medicine & Nootropic

With the rise of autodidactic biohacking and the public accessibility of science, dietary supplements and nootropics have come under more (justifiable) scrutiny; not the usual faux scrutiny by charlatans who worship doctors and pharmaceuticals, but instead reasonable and empirically-based concern. Meanwhile, marketing of overpriced health products and blends composed of various otherwise inexpensive compounds has … Continue reading Cinnamon as Economic Medicine & Nootropic

Nietzsche’s Gut-Brain Philosophy and What it Means For Us

Portrait of Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), (1894) by Curt Stoeving “What is known of the moral effects of different foods? Is there any philosophy of nutrition?” —Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science James T. Hong, in his 2017 lecture “On Nietzsche’s Second Brain”, embodies the vital philosopher-scientist perspective, conflating Nietzsche’s philosophical ideas to his dietary experiments and … Continue reading Nietzsche’s Gut-Brain Philosophy and What it Means For Us

Perfectionism, Mind, & Mitochondria: Dismantling the Rabblement

Moonlight Sorrow (ca. 1856) by Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa One factor in creative block is that the threshold of self-consciousness about the desired manifestation of your ideas overrides your ability to take action and create those ideas. In other words, your idiosyncrasies are not embraced within, and so are implicitly suppressed by your superego, and … Continue reading Perfectionism, Mind, & Mitochondria: Dismantling the Rabblement